Street Style Clothing – Naturabebes http://naturabebes.com/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 22:20:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://naturabebes.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-3.png Street Style Clothing – Naturabebes http://naturabebes.com/ 32 32 Style Summer to Fall 3 Ways: A Dress Transition Lesson from Glamorous Editors https://naturabebes.com/style-summer-to-fall-3-ways-a-dress-transition-lesson-from-glamorous-editors/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 14:54:09 +0000 https://naturabebes.com/style-summer-to-fall-3-ways-a-dress-transition-lesson-from-glamorous-editors/ There’s always that day, after Labor Day, when it seems like Mother Nature is officially telling her that summer is Finished. Suddenly there is a chill and the air is chilly, until 24 hours later it is sweltering again. Welcome to those short weeks of do-it-all style: when you’re not quite ready to put away […]]]>

There’s always that day, after Labor Day, when it seems like Mother Nature is officially telling her that summer is Finished. Suddenly there is a chill and the air is chilly, until 24 hours later it is sweltering again. Welcome to those short weeks of do-it-all style: when you’re not quite ready to put away your summer dresses, but are also eager to debut some fall pieces.

How you spend these weeks will depend on your location and lifestyle, and who you spend them with: one last cocktail on the rooftop? A first date at sunset? Or a weekend of apple picking? But no matter what your plans, Nine West has the perfect pair (or more!) of shoes for every occasion, from warm to cool weather. Below are three Charm editors with very different personal styles talk about how they’ll live their best life as they say goodbye to summer and kick off fall – and the Nine West shoes they’ll wear while doing it.


NAME AND TITLE Ariana Yaptangco, Beauty Editor

PERSONAL STYLE I like street style clothes, but also more refined and feminine things. Fashion is something I like to have fun with and I’m always experimenting with colors and patterns. My outfit definitely depends on my mood that day!

SUMMER TO FALL PLANS I will spend time with my friends and family, spend time outdoors and travel! I will take everything the trips I haven’t been able to take in the past two years.

]]>
According to This Street Style Set, these are the 10 best trends from New York Fashion Week https://naturabebes.com/according-to-this-street-style-set-these-are-the-10-best-trends-from-new-york-fashion-week/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 22:00:51 +0000 https://naturabebes.com/according-to-this-street-style-set-these-are-the-10-best-trends-from-new-york-fashion-week/ There’s always room in your wardrobe for timeless classics, and this street style season, pieces like standout knits and modern midi skirts have reigned supreme like those from Cos and Prada. Chic, wear-everywhere black sandals are proven seasonless as seen on this street styler. More than just sophisticated ready-to-wear, you can also look forward to […]]]>

There’s always room in your wardrobe for timeless classics, and this street style season, pieces like standout knits and modern midi skirts have reigned supreme like those from Cos and Prada. Chic, wear-everywhere black sandals are proven seasonless as seen on this street styler. More than just sophisticated ready-to-wear, you can also look forward to classic accessories like this women’s bag from Prada to complete your ever-stylish outfit.

Image may contain: clothes, clothes, skirt and shorts

Prada Kid mohair and muslin midi skirt

Image may contain: handbag, accessories, accessory, bag and purse

Small Prada Supernova handbag in brushed leather

Image may contain: clothes, hat and shoes

ATP Atelier Rosa cutout leather sandals


Want more of the forever classic Fall 2022 trend?


Photographed by Acielle StyleDuMonde.

On the street style scene this season, modern women have been seen embracing their inner bohemian spirit – think suede cowboy boots, patchwork patterns and handcrafted woven bags. For example, this street styler was spotted wearing a matching set from Sea, a brand synonymous with bohemian attire. With added glam elements, it’s a fall trend that deserves praise this season.

Image may contain: clothes, garment, sweater, jacket, coat, cardigan and blazer

Sea Deigo Fleece Lined Denim Patchwork Coat

Image may contain: clothing, skirt, pants, shorts, denim and jeans

Paper bag shorts in Sea Diego patchwork denim

Image may contain: clothing, shoes, boot and cowboy boot

Rag & Bone RB suede cowboy boots

The image may contain: Basket

Zadig & Voltair Le Cecilia bag


Want to know more about the modern bohemian trend for fall 2022?


Photographed by Acielle StyleDuMonde.

]]>
Innovative street and fashion photographer William Klein dies at 96 https://naturabebes.com/innovative-street-and-fashion-photographer-william-klein-dies-at-96/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 22:15:00 +0000 https://naturabebes.com/innovative-street-and-fashion-photographer-william-klein-dies-at-96/ William Klein, an American expatriate photographer whose often frenetic and sometimes blurry images of urban street life and modern fashion were hugely innovative while conveying the sharp social critique of a self-proclaimed outsider, died September 10 in Paris. He was 96 years old. His nephew Larry Reichman confirmed his death but did not cite a […]]]>

William Klein, an American expatriate photographer whose often frenetic and sometimes blurry images of urban street life and modern fashion were hugely innovative while conveying the sharp social critique of a self-proclaimed outsider, died September 10 in Paris. He was 96 years old.

His nephew Larry Reichman confirmed his death but did not cite a cause.

From his early years, Mr. Klein said, he was used to seeing the world as a perpetual stranger. He grew up in Depression-era Manhattan, a Jewish boy in a largely Irish neighborhood where he endured poverty and anti-Semitic bullying. Autonomy and a quick eye on one’s surroundings were means of survival – as was art. At 12, he began spending weekends wandering around the Museum of Modern Art, where his own work would one day be exhibited.

After his military service, he moved to France in the late 1940s to study painting. But he is very quickly captivated by photography when he realizes how playing with exposures can form, with infinite possibilities, a new genre of abstract art. The vibrant blurs he created were a revelation, he said, of the mood he felt swirling around him and his view of the world in general: its grit, its vibrancy, its splendor, its grotesque.

He proudly distanced himself from any school or method as he rose to prominence in the post-war years, favoring raw instinct over any established technique.

“I come from outside, the rules of photography didn’t interest me”, he once said. “There were things you could do with a camera that you couldn’t do with any other medium: grain, contrast, blurring, skew framing, eliminating or exaggerating gray tones, etc. I thought it would be good to show what is possible, to say that this is as valid a way of using the camera as conventional approaches.

Famous Vogue art director Alexander Liberman, who said he saw Mr. Klein as “a marvelous iconoclastic talent”, signed him to the fashion magazine from 1955 to 1965. Mr. Klein came up with radically original images which incorporated the blur, flash lighting, high-contrast impression, and eerie perspectives afforded by wide-angle and telephoto lenses.

“These were probably the most unpopular fashion photographs Vogue had ever published,” Klein told the Observer.

While living on Vogue’s allowance, he embarked on a personal project: a series of photographs taken in the streets of New York with the same techniques he applied to fashion. Through Mr. Klein’s lens, the streets revealed a messy modern world alive with action and opportunity, but also teeming with hostility.

Rejected by Vogue and by American book publishers, the images were published in an idiosyncratic tabloid-style book. Its full title, “Life Is Good & Good for You in New York: Trance Witness Revels”, was a collage of tabloid headlines.

“New York”, as the book became commonly known, was published in France in 1956 but not in America. Like Robert Frank’s landmark photographic volume, “The Americans” (1959), Klein’s book takes a piercing look at the myth of the American dream at the height of the Cold War. Mr Klein called it “my rant against America”.

Although many American art and photography critics disapproved of Mr. Klein’s style it was accused of “cheap sensational photography” – the book proved to be lastingly influential. In 1992, photography historian and critic Vicki Goldberg described Mr. Klein in the New York Times as a born rule-breaker who “played a major role in codifying a new perspective” in the visual arts.

He often used a wide-angle lens to include faces in the periphery of the frame or a telephoto lens to condense figures near and far, and he photographed his subjects before they were fully aware of his presence. He used the developing process to create high contrast and other poster effects, and he often cropped the results.

The most reproduced image from Mr. Klein’s book, known as “Gun 1”, shows a young boy with a tense and angry expression pointing a gun at the photographer, inches from the lens. An angelic-looking little boy seems to be trying to restrain his companion by putting a hand on his sleeve. The boys were playing, Mr. Klein explained, but nonetheless seemed to embody the emotional drama of city life.

“New York” was a multicultural tour de force, featuring many black and immigrant faces. The telephoto shot known as ‘4 heads, New York’ is in a single frame, Klein says, Italian police officer, Hispanic man, Jewish mother and an African American woman wearing a beret.

The design of the book was wildly experimental. Some photographs bleed from the edges of the page; others are grouped into grids. The volume included a loosely bound 16-page booklet containing captions for the images and a reproduction of a Mad magazine cover, ersatz advertisements for spaghetti and bras, and other ephemera. This apparent critique of creeping commercialism predates Andy Warhol’s pop art.

Mr. Klein called his work “pseudo-ethnographic, parodic, Dada,” the latter referring to a playful and absurd art movement of the early 20th century. He continued to photograph other cities – Rome, Moscow, Tokyo – while pursuing filmmaking, forming his lens on people who, like himself, had challenged the cultural mainstream.

His subjects included boxer Muhammad Ali, Black Panther frontman Eldridge Cleaver, and rock and roll pioneer Little Richard. In addition to his documentaries, Mr. Klein has created French-language feature films, including the fashion world parody “Who Are You, Polly Maggoo?” (1966) and the comedy “Mr. Freedom” (1968), about a superhero who uses his powers to strengthen American industrial and military imperialism.

Despite his prodigious production for more than 70 years, Mr. Klein never achieved the recognition in his native country enjoyed by peers such as Frank and Richard Avedon. The explanation lies partly in its absence. But his streak of independence also helped undermine his relationships with publishers, art directors and curators. It would be decades before his work was the subject of major exhibitions in the United States.

Mr Klein said he remained an “outsider” even in his adopted country, always the outside observer ready to see the complexities under the spell of the surface. His 2002 book “Paris + Klein” – showing Rubenian women in a Turkish bath, protesters of African descent demanding their rights, Chinese New Year celebrations – rejected the romanticized view of the City of Light.

William Klein was born in Manhattan on April 19, 1926. His father was a tailor who owned a clothing store but lost it in the stock market crash of 1929; his mother was a housewife.

A precocious student, he graduated from high school at age 14 and enrolled at the City College of New York. He left in 1946 to enlist in the army. While stationed in Allied-occupied Germany, he became a cartoonist for the military newspaper Stars and Stripes and, on his own, won his first camera, a professional-grade Rolleiflex, at a a game of poker on the base.

Upon his release in 1948, he moved to Paris to attend the Sorbonne and studied under the painter Fernand Léger. A few years later, abstract photographs he had taken for the architecture magazine Domus were seen by Liberman, who brought him back to New York to work for Vogue.

Mr Klein married Jeanne Florin (also known as Janine) after spotting her on the Left Bank his first week in Paris. She worked briefly as a model and later managed her husband’s schedule. She died in 2005. Survivors include a son, Pierre Klein, and a sister.

Mr. Klein’s first film was “Broadway by Light” (1958), an abstract celebration of the neon nights of Times Square. While continuing to work in film, Mr. Klein returned to still photography in the 1980s, as a market for fine art photographs developed and his early work was discovered by a new generation of street photographers.

Major institutions such as the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Tate Modern in London have organized retrospectives of his output. The New York-based International Center of Photography presented him with its Lifetime Achievement Award in 2007.

When the Center Pompidou in Paris opened a major exhibition of his work, Mr. Klein told the Los Angeles Times in 2006 that his most reproduced image – the boy with the gun – had been misunderstood for decades.

“Now I get phone calls all the time, ‘We’re a magazine in Norway and we’re doing something about where our kids come from,'” he said. “I had maybe 30 or 40 covers that were done with this photo and the title, ‘What are our kids coming to do?’ ”

The children depicted in the photo, he added, expressed two aspects of his own personality.

“You can see in the next shot that the child is laughing,” Klein said. “If you really look at the picture, it’s a picture of them and me; I was a tough little boy and I was also an angelic little boy scared of a street corner gang.

]]>
5 Tastemakers share their clothing tips https://naturabebes.com/5-tastemakers-share-their-clothing-tips/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 14:23:14 +0000 https://naturabebes.com/5-tastemakers-share-their-clothing-tips/ It’s no secret that New York is one of the most stylish places in the world. Lest you forget this, when February and September roll around, hordes of street style stars descend on the Big Apple for New York Fashion Week, quickly reminding you of the sartorial prowess of the city. That said, you don’t […]]]>

It’s no secret that New York is one of the most stylish places in the world. Lest you forget this, when February and September roll around, hordes of street style stars descend on the Big Apple for New York Fashion Week, quickly reminding you of the sartorial prowess of the city. That said, you don’t have to have to live in vibrant neighborhoods like SoHo or Williamsburg in order to tap into the New York style. With just a few basic tips and tricks from its most experienced and best-dressed residents, you too can master this. I do not know what. (More on this, to come.)

Given that NYC is often referred to as a “great melting pot” of different cultures and personalities, it therefore makes sense that when it comes to fashion, there is no single “recipe” for copying this. imitable New York style. Each resident has their own unique approach to dressing for any season and/or occasion. However, there are a few heart principles of style to which the majority of city dwellers refer to compose their everyday outfits. To begin with, everyone seems to possess an unabashed individuality and an innate disposition to experiment with their outfits.

“When I was 14, I loved nothing more than the feeling of escaping the suburbs and heading to New York because it meant I could dress any as my heart desired,” Danielle Guizio, fashion designer and founder of her eponymous clothing brand, told TZR. “I could wear absolutely anything and never be judged or made fun of for it. Coming from a small town, [it] It was so liberating for me to know that there was a land far away where I could be whoever I wanted to be.

In addition to having this creative freedom, New Yorkers can change their wardrobe once every few months as the seasons change, which lends itself to even more sartorial experimentation. When dressing up at any time of the year, Squarespace Marketing Director and New York fashion connoisseur Kinjil Mathur looks to the city’s character for inspiration. “[NYC] has a pulse that crosses the streets. In the fall, the energy is so intense that you can feel it running through your veins,” says Mathur. “To me, NYC style is all of that – movement – ​​and how your look will move with you as you walk down the street or across a room.”

Indeed, those who have already been lucky enough to be in town in the fall will notice that there is something so special about dressing for the cooler season. As the temperatures drop, everyone easily pulls out their polished wool and gabardine down jackets and coats. Then they jump straight into testing the latest denim trends with their pant jeans and patchwork skirts, while playing with creative layering ideas. In short, the fashion metropolis is becoming fertile ground for testing the latest trends and creating new ones.

TZR reached out to five New Yorkers of varying careers and styles to find out how you can recreate this quintessential New York ensemble. Keep scrolling to check out their wardrobe essentials and trend predictions for Fall 2022, as well as shop their respective wishlists.

We may receive a portion of sales if you purchase a product through a link in this article.

Telsha Anderson-Boone, stylist and owner/buyer at ta

Wardrobe essentials: “NYC girl style is the perfect balance of sexy and comfortable. Be yourself! Try something new!”

Key trends for fall 2022: “[Personally]I’m looking for a nice bag [that can] fits everything without looking bulky and a dress that can go from day to night effortlessly.

Danielle Guizio, Founder, CEO and Creative Director at Danielle Guizio

Wardrobe essentials: “There’s an extremely easy vibe here in New York, so your best bet in trying to master a ‘NYC girl aesthetic’ is to simply not try at all. It’s the best part of New York – every no one here is one of a kind, and no one can take that away from you. i will definitely wear […] lots of fitted sweaters and blazers with matching micro skirts.

Key trends for fall 2022: “Pleated skirts, sweaters, sweater vests, knee high socks, schoolgirl aesthetics and Mary Jane shoes. I have a feeling that the wave of 90s fashion in London will also be coming in full force this fall/winter.

Caroline Maguire, fashion director at Shopbop

Wardrobe essentials: “Every NYC style purveyor needs a must-have pair of denim. It’s a must-have for any look and works with anything. I think a mini bag to store just your essentials is also essential, as well as a pair of superstar sunglasses.Plus, every girl in New York needs a good pair of shoes for walking – I personally like a chunky boot or some standout sneakers.

Key trends for fall 2022: “I’m looking for original shoes, sneakers and sandals! I’ll be running in New York throughout September and want shoes that are both comfortable and chic, with bold and fun details that reflect my style.

Kinjil Mathur, Marketing Director at Squarespace

Wardrobe essentials: “[The pieces] should be non-binding: flowing pants, swinging jackets, fluttering sleeves, dancing skirts.

Key trends for fall 2022: “Rocking exaggerated, oversized straight-leg pants, embracing all shades of brown, and sporting everything embellished and bedazzled: bags, dresses, shoes, etc.”

Pamela Tick, DJ and creative entrepreneur

Wardrobe essentials: “I always go back to the classics. A few essentials in my NYC closet [are] a quality leather jacket, timeless black combat boots and Levi’s [jeans].”

Key trends for fall 2022: “Overall, people like to challenge themselves in New York, and fall is the best time of year to be inspired by that. I’m always [shopping for] a killer boot! For me, my headphones are also important – I like to match them to my outfits when I DJ.

]]>
The best places to shop for fall fashion in Vancouver https://naturabebes.com/the-best-places-to-shop-for-fall-fashion-in-vancouver/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 19:29:11 +0000 https://naturabebes.com/the-best-places-to-shop-for-fall-fashion-in-vancouver/ Sweater season. Fall fashion comes with a list of usual suspects. Zara, American Eagle, Anthropologie, and Urban Outfitters top the list of best places to shop for fall outfits every year, and while they have massive selections that change multiple times throughout the season, the side effect unfortunate about that – besides the obvious environmental […]]]>

Sweater season.

Fall fashion comes with a list of usual suspects.

Zara, American Eagle, Anthropologie, and Urban Outfitters top the list of best places to shop for fall outfits every year, and while they have massive selections that change multiple times throughout the season, the side effect unfortunate about that – besides the obvious environmental factor – is that everyone walks away with the same things.

Not only does it perpetuate this idea that clothes are disposable, but it also downplays a lot of what makes fashion important and fun, it’s all about personal individual expression.

Maybe for some, blending in with the crowd is the goal, but for those looking for something different, these stores in Vancouver offer looks that are often unique, either by the nature of being consignment and vintage stores or because they stock niche brands that other places don’t have.

Here are the best places to shop for fall fashion in Vancouver.

Before & Company

If both looks of the season are whimsical and collegiate, then curated consignment shop Front & Company, which takes up half a block on Main Street, has you covered for both with their two pop-ups that are in progress. until November. They have a 90s pop-up in their main store and an academic pop-up next door. Both popups consist of pre-loved contemporary and vintage pieces that the store has stocked to fit the varsity category (like blazers, button-ups, and loafers) or ’90s (like strappy dresses, chunky sweaters and miniskirts). The store rotates its offerings seasonally, so there are also plenty of other fall items like coats, boots and accessories to buy.


The block

The Block in Gastown is a super unique modern fashion store filled with niche designers like Allison Wonderland, Colorful Standard, Bower and others you may not have heard of before. The store offers men’s and women’s clothing as well as shoes and accessories with just a few pieces of each piece. They’re still rolling out their fall collection, but there are already art deco patterned sweaters, cardigans and vests from European designers featured on their Instagram.

Faulkner

Vancouver-based luxury vintage retailer Faulkner is currently creating an all-womens collection to follow up on its recent menswear collaboration with Grailed. The new drop will take place later this month and will feature over 100 fall fashion pieces. The storefront closed during COVID and is now strictly e-commerce by locals who can pick up items from the Gastown studio. VIA will update this story as the new collection becomes available, but in the meantime, keep an eye on Faulkner’s site.

environmentalist

Ecologyst is for minimalists and adventurers. This local brand has stores across British Columbia and strives to make durable clothing that can be worn for work and play. Most of the pieces are genderless and monochromatic in merino wool or organic cotton. The durability, fabric and coloring of Ecologyst pieces make them perfect fall basics and staples for creating street style looks. Ecologyst also offers a Second Life program where it buys and sells pre-loved stocks and apparel industry funds fuel their environmental documentary film company.

Hey Jude

The style of this vintage boutique is permanently autumnal. Most of the vintage pieces come in shades of cream, brown, mustard, and green that are extremely soothing to look at in a single store, let alone the seasons. Located on Abbott Street, Hey Jude also offers independent brands, homewares and accessories. Expect to find plenty of trendy blazers, flowy blouses, skirts and pants. There might even be a pair of cowboy boots still in the window if you hurry.


A lot + little

Much + Little is an adorable gift shop on Main Street that offers homewares, self-care and lifestyle products, accessories, and clothing for women and children. The fall and winter collection has just landed and includes cozy knit turtleneck dresses, oversized shirts, loungewear and more. The collection comes from a mix of local and independent designers, heritage brands and artisans focused on craftsmanship and long-term wearability, so you won’t find any trends here.

8th and main

While this store was originally on 8th & Main, as the name suggests, it now has locations on Granville Street and in Victoria as well. The store started out as a vintage and second-hand boutique, but has since expanded into new, contemporary women’s clothing. This is a great place to shop for fall fashion items as the balance between new and vintage items covers all style and aesthetic bases. For example, if you like the trend of rib knit t-shirts with exposed seams, they just had them in stock or if you prefer 90s crochet sweaters and vintage Bratz graphic t-shirts, they have it too.

]]>
All the New York Fashion Week debuts, homecomings and late-night events you need to know https://naturabebes.com/all-the-new-york-fashion-week-debuts-homecomings-and-late-night-events-you-need-to-know/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 13:18:35 +0000 https://naturabebes.com/all-the-new-york-fashion-week-debuts-homecomings-and-late-night-events-you-need-to-know/ Over the past few years, the fashion industry has made strides towards inclusivity. Although it is now almost the norm to see models of diverse races, bodies and genders on the runway, one community that remains underrepresented is that of people with disabilities. This season, two events will aim to turn the tide. The September […]]]>

Over the past few years, the fashion industry has made strides towards inclusivity. Although it is now almost the norm to see models of diverse races, bodies and genders on the runway, one community that remains underrepresented is that of people with disabilities. This season, two events will aim to turn the tide. The September 8 Double Take fashion show is the result of a collaboration between Open Style Lab, an organization dedicated to creating functional and wearable solutions for people of all abilities, and the spinal muscular atrophy community. Andrea Saieh, a 2022 Open Style Lab Fellow whose work will be featured on the show, tailored a purple velvet suit for author Shane Burcaw, who has SMA and uses an electric wheelchair. “I added an invisible zipper in the back of the jacket to make dressing easier and stretch panels at the elbows to accommodate bending,” Saieh explained. “Matching tailored velor pants have two layers – a comfortable L-shaped base and an interchangeable cover that goes over the top.” On September 12, the Runway of Dreams Foundation will return to NYFW for its seventh year and showcase adaptive fashion from Tommy Hilfiger, Target, and Zappos, among others. With brands like Gucci also putting disability inclusion at the forefront, how long before the rest of the industry follows suit? We’ll watch.—Laia Garcia-Furtado

Los Angeles Call

]]>
Performance apparel brand Vuori opens first Connecticut store in Westport https://naturabebes.com/performance-apparel-brand-vuori-opens-first-connecticut-store-in-westport/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 09:42:36 +0000 https://naturabebes.com/performance-apparel-brand-vuori-opens-first-connecticut-store-in-westport/ WESTPORT — Southern California-style activewear has made its way to southern Connecticut with the launch of Vuori, a new store at 166 Main Street that opened Sept. 2. Vuori calls itself “a fresh take on performance apparel,” inspired by the active lifestyles of coastal California. The company got its start in 2015 in Encinitas, Calif., […]]]>

WESTPORT — Southern California-style activewear has made its way to southern Connecticut with the launch of Vuori, a new store at 166 Main Street that opened Sept. 2.

Vuori calls itself “a fresh take on performance apparel,” inspired by the active lifestyles of coastal California.

The company got its start in 2015 in Encinitas, Calif., with CEO Joe Kudla, who played sports and injured himself, before turning to yoga.

River Stevens, managing director of Vuori, said that Kudla couldn’t find clothes that worked for him, so he decided to take matters into his own hands and get into the clothing business.

Products range from shorts to pants, tank tops, t-shirts, hats, bags and other accessories and much more.

Stevens said the Westport store is his 22nd location and the first in the state. There are other locations in California, Arizona, Utah, Texas, Massachusetts, and Washington, among others.

“It’s very close and it’s very family-friendly,” Stevens said of Westport.

He compared it to their home base in Encinitas, citing similarities between the communities.

“Everyone’s family – it feels like the community is close here,” he said.

There has also been an influx of online orders from the area, Stevens said.

Zak Allegri, community and training manager for the east, said: “Our biggest customers come from Westport.”

Allegri also noted that Westport is an active community, which fits well with Vuori’s brand.

Stevens said there is versatility in Vuori’s clothing, where items can be worn multiple times. He compared Vuori’s style to Lululemon and Athleta, with Southern California elements.

“The colors are a bit more subdued,” he said. “We use a lot of recycled polyester, organic cotton.”

He added that Kudla “really cares about the product, the specs and its functionality,” Allegri said. “It’s designed to move in, designed to sweat, styled for life.”

Vuori held an exclusive pre-opening event on September 1. The event drew a large and enthusiastic crowd, he said.

“I think everyone is really excited to be here,” Stevens said. “I’ve been here for a few days too, everyone who passes by is really excited to open this store.”

“To see that they’re excited for us to be here and to see people wearing it when they arrive is so cool,” Allegri said.

Allegri said Vuori will host community events, such as yoga inside the store and other classes.

“We are very connected to our community,” Allegri said.

Inside the store, the company usually presents its new products. Stevens said new items are brought in every four to six weeks.

Allegri said the most popular items include the men’s Kore Short and the women’s performance joggers.

“I think they’re working a few years ahead of us right now,” Stevens said of Vuori’s designers.

Currently, the brand is also sold in other stores, such as Nordstrom and REI.

“We have an investment in happiness,” Allegri said. “You can test your product. If you don’t like it, you can return or exchange.

Stevens said he hopes Vuori grows in Connecticut and that they can make a deep connection with the Westport community.

“Take a bit of the west coast and bring it to the east coast,” Stevens said of Vuori.

kayla.mutchler@hearstmediact.com

]]>
WWD Fashion Museum explores New York’s style heritage in photos – ARTnews.com https://naturabebes.com/wwd-fashion-museum-explores-new-yorks-style-heritage-in-photos-artnews-com/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 19:06:00 +0000 https://naturabebes.com/wwd-fashion-museum-explores-new-yorks-style-heritage-in-photos-artnews-com/ How do you properly tell the story of a city – any city – but specifically New York City, a 320 square mile expanse of layered stories and singular attitude? Make it an ode to clothes. “A Matter of Style,” a pop-up fashion museum opening Sept. 9, is an exploration of New York’s sartorial heritage, […]]]>

How do you properly tell the story of a city – any city – but specifically New York City, a 320 square mile expanse of layered stories and singular attitude? Make it an ode to clothes.

“A Matter of Style,” a pop-up fashion museum opening Sept. 9, is an exploration of New York’s sartorial heritage, framed by the extensive photographic archive of Fairchild Media Group, whose portfolio includes the faithful Observer of style Everyday women’s clothing. (WWD is owned by Penske Media Corporation, the same parent company as ART news.) The museum, presented at AG Studios in Manhattan, will showcase exclusive artwork, vintage fashion, immersive experiences and photography in tandem with New York Fashion Week.

Related Articles

Fairchild, founded by John Fairchild in 1910, has one of the most important archives of fashion photography in the media. It includes candids of quintessential New York personalities alongside images of everyday people whose daily dramas unfold outside the spotlight.

There’s Jackie Kennedy, who escapes from her usual lunch spot, La Grenouille. Downtown luminaries like Andy Warhol and Patti Smith appeared in its pages. The eras of American history unfold before the photographer’s lens: the stiff skirts synonymous with the nuclear family; the beaded and fringed waist of the hippies; and the dapper power uniform of the Black Panther era. “Style is a language and reflects history like any other type of visual medium,” writer and image activist Michaela Angela Davis once said. WWD.

“A Matter of Style” comes at a fruitful time for fashion exhibitions. Perhaps due to the enduring popularity of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute, the garment entered the artistic institution – not always an ongoing process – where its historical weight is taken into account. Currently, an investigation into the work of the late artist and designer Virgil Abloh is underway at the Brooklyn Museum. And the Costume Institute’s latest big release also focused on American fashion, but with a greater emphasis on its relationship to European haute couture.

The Fairchild Museum’s focus on New York is a nice diversion. This should offer insight into how the personal and the political intersect on our clothes.

To learn more about the show, ART news spoke over the phone with its curator, visual culture historian, archivist and design educator Tonya Blazio-Licorish. A condensed version of the conversation follows below.

Can you tell us a bit about your role as an archivist?

My work here revolves around archive content for all Fairchild brands. I came to PMC as a historian of visual culture. And so, I use my background in fashion history to bring an element of storytelling to how I look at the Fairchild archives, which is just an incredible amount of information. Truly, it’s a well-deserved moment for Fairchild, which has been there to capture what, exactly, fashion has been saying for decades. She celebrates her 112th birthday this year. It captures the history of fashion, which encompasses designers, catwalks, celebrities, music, art – no part of our culture is spared. This show will focus specifically on the history of fashion in New York.

And how did you find a story to tell about New York?

I focused on the people, places and things that made it a global fashion city, but also made it unique other fashion city. It’s about creating context: what was happening at the time, disguised as what New Yorkers were wearing. I mean, just think denim – think about the effect of this shot of James Dean in jeans and a white t-shirt. You are instantly transported to that exact moment.

And New York – America, really – has evolved differently from European capitals; its modes were more democratic. Denim and other fashions reflected America’s desire to form its own cultural zeitgeist. Think the earthquake of the 60s, the Black Panther uniforms of the 70s. Every generation was trying to say something.

How do you think WWD stand out from similar fashion publications?

The exhibition focuses on how WWD captured that, how intimate it was with the landscape. John Fairchild viewed fashion as a conversation, how its advances could predict the trajectory of the zeitgeist. From the start, WWD would do a street style photoshoot in and around town – it was called “They Wear” and it appeared weekly in the publication. New York in general was one of the first fashion capitals to pay close attention not just to what the models wore, but to everyone else, probably since there have always been so many photographers working here. “The Ladies Who Lunch” is another trademark of the magazine – it was dedicated to the life of socialites. In a way, this was all an early form of social media.

As an image historian, what do you think of the “is the art of fashion” debate?

The understanding of fashion as an art form has changed. Fashion is a cultural memory in which we live; it is logical that it opens onto a highly critical space. Fashion is art – it has levels, it has processes. He has inspiration, he tells a story. The person who carves it can speak softly or very, very loudly. And going back to the idea that American fashion is democratic, it’s like that with art too. Art and fashion at a time are those things that may seem out of reach or inaccessible. But this is never the case.

]]>
Rochelle Humes’ This Morning outfit is under £100 https://naturabebes.com/rochelle-humes-this-morning-outfit-is-under-100/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 10:36:14 +0000 https://naturabebes.com/rochelle-humes-this-morning-outfit-is-under-100/ With the school holidays nearly over, Holly Willoughby and Philip Schofield return to This morning imminently. During their absence, they left the series in good hands with Dermot O’Leary, Alison Hammond, Rylan Clark, Ruth Langsford, Josie Gibson and many more illuminating our screens each morning. Replacing the dynamic duo this week are Rochelle Humes and […]]]>

With the school holidays nearly over, Holly Willoughby and Philip Schofield return to This morning imminently. During their absence, they left the series in good hands with Dermot O’Leary, Alison Hammond, Rylan Clark, Ruth Langsford, Josie Gibson and many more illuminating our screens each morning.

Replacing the dynamic duo this week are Rochelle Humes and Vernon Kay. If you’re one of the many people who watch the show for Willoughby’s edgy outfits, the good news is that Humes has also started sharing her own style on Instagram.

Already this week she’s been showing us some on-trend looks – on Monday she found the perfect fall ensemble from Pretty Little Thing and River Island, while more recently she looked stylish in a beige suit from Jigsaw.

For today’s look, the presenter and her This morning Stylist Amber Jackson opted for a similar fall look – a brown embroidered midi dress from street-favorite H&M brand and white high-heeled boots from women’s shoe brand Misspap.

Whether you’re looking for transitional outfit inspiration or need something new to wear to the office, here’s how to shop for the stylish look.

Where is Rochelle Humes’ outfit from and where can I buy it?

Today Rochelle Humes’ brown embroidered long sleeve midi dress is from H&M and costs £49.99. Keeping the ensemble under £100, her white heeled boots are £33 at Misspap.

H&M dress with embroidery: £49.99, Hm.com

(H&M)

Featuring a mid-calf length hem, fall-ready long sleeves, a high back slit and a round neckline, this dress also has a keyhole opening and tight ties which add details to the back of the neck. A gathered seam on each side of the waist gives the piece a flattering silhouette, while embroidered details add the finishing touch.

Buy now

Misspap Faux Leather Pointed Block Heel Boots: £33, Misspap.com

(Miss Pap)

Contrasting the darker hue of the dress, Humes paired the brown midi with a pair of pointed white leather-effect boots from Misspap. A bargain at £33, the knee high boots feature a high block heel and ruched detailing.

Buy now

Who is Rochelle Humes’ stylist for This Morning?

Amber Jackson is the fashion editor of This morning and stylist for ITV. She dresses Rochelle Humes in the fabulous outfits we see every day and compiles the pieces for the fashion segment on the show.

How does Rochelle Humes do her hair?

Maurice Flynn, aka @Mauriceflynn on Instagram, is the hairstylist behind Rochelle Humes. This morning mane.

Where is Rochelle Humes from?

Rochelle was born in Barking, an east London suburb and attended Frances Bardsley Academy for Girls in Hornchurch and Colin’s Performing Arts School. She began her career with British pop group S Club Juniors and later joined girl group The Saturdays in 2007. Since then Rochelle has moved into television presenting and often works alongside her JLS star husband , Marvin Humes.

Not ready for fall yet? Take a look at our selection of best summer dresses

]]>
Here are some fashion tips for girls going to college https://naturabebes.com/here-are-some-fashion-tips-for-girls-going-to-college/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 09:14:31 +0000 https://naturabebes.com/here-are-some-fashion-tips-for-girls-going-to-college/ Fashion is a daily evolving thing that changes with the seasons. Young boys and girls, especially those going to college, are always paying more attention to their fashion statements and they keep looking for new fashion tips for everyday life. So, if you are also a student and looking for fashion tips to style your […]]]>

Fashion is a daily evolving thing that changes with the seasons. Young boys and girls, especially those going to college, are always paying more attention to their fashion statements and they keep looking for new fashion tips for everyday life. So, if you are also a student and looking for fashion tips to style your daily outfit, you are on the right page. Here are some of the designers tips that one could use for their improvement. Read on to find out more!

Cut expensive clothes

In India, students hardly earn their expenses while studying, if not in dire need. The rising cost of higher education is sometimes overwhelming for parents. Wearing expensive designer clothes, accessories and shoes should not be an option for female students.

Instead, they can choose urban style clothes available in abundance in any metropolitan city that will suit their budget. Girls can look lovely in street style outfits and can even look better than people who actually date in trendy clothes and expensive brands. Most designer clothes are expensive due to brand value.

So it depends on individuals’ choice and patience to search for stylish clothes and accessories even with low budget.

Keep up to date with trends

Keeping up with fashion updates by following magazines or Pinterest can really help sort things out easily. Fashion trends are constantly changing and if girls pay attention to changed elements of trends and incorporate them into their styles, they will stand out from the crowd.

Replicating the looks of celebrities and influencers isn’t always necessary. They can create their own style statement by taking inspiration from trends.

Transform old clothes

If the students, outside of studies, have an interest in DIY (Do It Yourself) and can easily transform their old clothes into new ones, it will help them to experiment with styles. J

This is how they can use the already existing resources and do something new with them. Plus, a lot of their money is saved.

Track YouTube and Instagram videos

Youtube channels and Instagram profiles of fashion influencers as well as celebrities play an important role in influencing fashion trends. It is very popular among college going girls to follow fashion and clothing reels which actually help them sort out what to wear and what not.

Girls unfamiliar with fashion magazines and blogs can easily scroll through influencer profiles and find ideas to recreate their own styles.

Show your morphology without hesitation

Young people usually follow fashion trends ignoring the fact that they should actually wear clothes that will flaunt their body type. There are no rules for experimenting with fashion.

Staying confident while choosing what you like even if you think that particular outfit may not suit your body type is important. Gone are the days when people behaved too consciously about body types. Staying confident and ecstatic will make things more fashionable for girls.

Wear comfortable walking shoes

Unless you like being miserable, it’s mandatory. Platform shoes, especially the tendency to wear extravagant styles, were popular fashion trends in the disco scene for both men and women. Ladies, please don’t walk around campus in high-heeled shoes.

It’s not the city – it’s a college campus, and you’re going to be consistently consistent. You should try formal or simple shoes on weekdays. Save the cute heels for the weekend.

Hand bags

The very first and only trend that a college girl should consider following religiously is the design and style of the handbag. Handbags can do the magic, dress sense matters, because without good dress sense and the right colors.

(With contributions from Kanchankuntala Das, fashion designer and Chitra Singh, fashion designer)

]]>